Grants are non-renewable and recipients have five years from announcement of the award to complete their project and claim their final payment. Applicants can be from any country and any university in the world. US citizenship or residency is not required. The foundation supports projects with a social policy application on either a global or local level. No specific weight is given to any one area. We encourage applicants to look at the kind of projects we have supported in previous years.

See Previous Recipients. Awards are made to individuals, not institutions. If processed through an institution, a waiver for overhead is required.

Recipients are expected to acknowledge assistance provided by the foundation in any publication resulting from their research and should notify the foundation with publication details. Grants are issued immediately on receipt of an acceptance letter from the recipient. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure the grant does not conflict with other funding they have secured. Grants are usually administered in June of the year they are decided.

These awards cannot be applied for directly, and are only granted at the discretion of the Trustees. Donald R. Cressey Award. Criminal Justice and Penology Practices.

Eli Ginzberg Award. Health and Welfare, particularly in urban settings. Harold D.

Independent Social Research Foundation

Lasswell Award. International Relations and Foreign Affairs. Irving Louis Horowitz Award.

independent social research foundation

John L. Stanley Award. Joshua Feigenbaum Award. Arts, Popular Culture, and Mass Communication. Martinus Nijhoff Award. Robert K. Merton Award. Addresses the relationship between Social Theory and Public Policy. Trustees' Award. Aim and Mission Grant Information. Funding Amount Funding Available. Eligibility Who can apply?

Criteria Criteria. Conditions Conditions.To browse Academia. Skip to main content. Log In Sign Up. Independent Social Research Foundation. Unfollow Follow Unblock. Other Affiliations:. It is dedicated to cross-fertilisation in the social sciences, the promotion of new modes of inquiry and the development of interdisciplinary expertise and methods. One of its specific objectives is to promote better understanding of social entities and processes and see this used in solving subject specific problems.

To achieve this objective it intends to provide a series of research grants, enter into partnerships with academic institutions and support research activities that promote development in its field.

The Independent Social Research Foundation ISRF is a public benefit foundation funded by a group of private philanthropists with interests in academia and social science, founded in The Past in the Present more.

independent social research foundation

What happens when social scientists and historians meet and talk? For historians and archaeologistswhat constitutes knowledge and how and by whom it is produced is always specifically historically situated, while social scientists, from anthropologists to psychologists, remind us that there is always also a spatial or environmental element to knowledge. People across time and space cannot be expected to think or know in the same ways and by looking at how things change in historical perspective, we shed fresh light on global transformations more widely.

Issue: 17 Publication Date: Save to Library. What is the law? How is it created and enforced? As a system of culturally attuned rules designed to control behaviour that is upheld through a variety of state-endorsed institutions, the law affects everyone — the living and the dead. In its quest to protect people and private property, the law of the land is administrated through the use of violence where the state deems this necessary.

As such, although it may be intended that the law applies to all people equally, in practice its weight is biased according to race and also access to social and financial capital. Read On LawSocial Sciencesand Interdisciplinarity. You will have a picture in your mind of what archaeology is, what it looks like. This may be a little different. The papers in this volume stem from those margins of archaeology that The papers in this volume stem from those margins of archaeology that seek to do something more with archaeological practice than those perhaps more easily recognisable processes of excavation, analysis and formal reporting of objects, sites and landscapes.

Why is the future a topic for social science?

As we tell our students, the social world is an object of study for us because we are curious about what happens to us and want to understand things now, and also because we want to act so as to secure or at least to influence the future in our favour. We want, that is, the best possible future we can imagine. Sewell Jr. Social Sciences and Interdisciplinarity. What does the future look like from where we are now? Nevertheless, following the U.John C.

Funding Opportunities

The extension of state power in the U. Today's high school students are woefully unaware of the importance of their unique history. Despite being home to some of the greatest minds in technology, California continues failing to modernize its IT systems, much less do so under budget. State agencies are swindling taxpayers and breaking the public trust.

Independent Institute Senior Fellow Dr. Williamson M. Evers has created one of the most exhaustive annotated reading lists ever assembled regarding the issues of civil rights, policing, race, and the welfare state. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Compiled by Senior Fellow Dr. Evers, this annotated list of recommended readings highlights some of the most insightful critiques of socialism ever written. Catalyst is our website dedicated to issues that millennials care about the most: jobs, housing costs, education, student debt, healthcare, and more.

Learn, engage, and connect. Subscriptions and recent single issues are now available in electronic format on your mobile device or tablet! In Memoriam: Walter E. New Report: B. Catalyst: Young Voices for Liberty. Closing Schools Was a Grievous Error. The Beacon Sen. Watkins, Jr.Those familiar with the Bulletin will know that it usually consists of a number of short articles produced by ISRF Fellows, often with responses from Academic Advisors.

What happens when social scientists and historians meet and talk? For historians and archaeologistswhat constitutes knowledge and how and by whom it is produced is always specifically historically situated, while social scientists, from anthropologists to psychologists, remind us that there is always also a spatial or environmental element to knowledge.

People across time and space cannot be expected to think or know in the same ways and by looking at how things change in historical perspective, we shed fresh light on global transformations more widely.

For example, Edna Bonhomme Fellow of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science discusses this matter in relation to attitudes to health and healing in the Middle East see her article, this issue. Not least, many. However, with the exception perhaps of Frantz Fanon1, most philosophers of social science writing in the mid-twentieth century would not have considered social science or social scientists at fault, which serves to further illustrate the importance of continually re-evaluating history itself, revisiting what we know to reassess how it is understood from professional and popular perspectives.

From the Troubles in Northern Ireland to the fatalities following the most recent election in Zimbabwe, what happens when debate is exhausted and when situations become interminably polarised is unrest and violence. The true value of re-evaluating what we think and why is well unpacked in relation to identity politics by Sherrill Stroschein this issue.

Identity, a standard research subject for social scientists of all types for well over a century, is an extremely powerful contributor to politics. To cite a recent U. For example, with the exception of seasonal tourism, trades, and low-paid retail jobs, there is almost no work in the county. One interpretation of the Cornish Brexit result is that it was important for voters to send a strong message of disagreement and disgruntlement to those faceless international lawyers in Brussels and politicians in Whitehall.

Far from white sand beaches and idyllic cottages, the hugely under-employed, poverty ridden Cornish interior 1. Fanon, F. Black Skin, White Masks.

Centre for Independent Social Research

It has been a great pleasure working for the Foundation and I hope to remain a keen colleague as it grows and blooms in new directions. See also Agamben, G. State of Exception. Not given to gestures, we do not envisage a celebratory event. But the fact, and the marker, of the passage of a decade naturally prompt reflection on how things have gone so far.

Evidently, in terms of research done that might not otherwise have been done our Fellows tell us, and their work shows that indeed, something has been achieved. Against this background, at the ISRF we aim to maintain a hopeful blend of the ideal of an intellectual ethic with a realistically achievable output, in, among other media, the Bulletin. This in-house endeavour has been taken forward by three editors to date, now to be followed by a fourth when Lars Cornelissen takes over the role from Rachael Kiddey in November.Centre for Independent Social Research CISR is a nongovernmental research institute in Russia working in four main areas: Social research projects; professional development of young sociologists; the formation of professional networks in the social sciences; Sociological expertise and consultations.

The CISR activities are financed mainly through Russian and international scientific funds and philanthropic organizations. Sincethe John D. Inspired by the rapid social and political changes taking place in the country, they gathered a group of enthusiasts and started conducting their own independent research projects. Edward Fomin, Elena Zdravomyslova, and Ingrid Oswald actively participated in the practical fulfillment of this idea. They all shared a desire to create a flexible, democratic research structure that would be capable of responding to the demands of a quickly changing Russian society and of promoting the integration of Russian sociologists into the international sociological community.

The Center actually began working a few years before it was legally registered in Inthe Center acquired a converted apartment office on Vasileostrovsky Island. Thanks to the active participation of Ingrid Oswald and the support of Peter Lock and other colleagues and friends of the Center, CISR quickly developed, received more and more grants from international foundations, conducted various research projects, and became a visible actor in the Russian and international sociological communities.

social research methods

MacArthur Foundation. Petersburg Under the direction of the Convention, the first two books of the series Qualitative Methods in Social Research were published: I. Shteinberg, T. Shanin, E. Kovalev, A. Levinson Qualitative Methods. The Center has always occupied itself with the socialization of young researchers. In andan analogous program was opened in partnership with the upper school Osterlens Folkhogskola Tomelilla, Sweden for Swedish students.

CISR employs 22 individuals: 12 hold Ph. Professional areas of research include:. Approximately 30 research projects are carried out every year. Petersburg, St.

independent social research foundation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Centre for independent social research. Russian research institute. Archived from the original on Retrieved Categories : Social sciences organizations Sociological organizations Social research Research institutes in Russia.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Non-governmental organisation. Academic research. PetersburgRussia.Want to come to France?

Find a fellowship somewhere in the world? Or simply get your research project funded? Here's all the information you need.

You feel like moving, setting off, going international, simply discovering all the possibilities for conducting your research outside France? You want to come to France for a research stay? You are looking for grants to fund a research program? Once you have chosen the area you are interested in, you will find a list of all open calls matching your search.

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independent social research foundation

Simply use the "Submit a call" button on the bottom left and send us your suggestion, we will publish it as soon as possible.

Your help is greatly appreciated! If you want to know why you should go for this programme, or understand the indicated SSH rate for European projects, just click on the information icon above the call title. Nota: not every call features such an analysis. If you want to join in, just click on "Join the discussion" on the right of each call. Make sure you have a Linkedin account for that.

You might also find feedback by other scholars on that specific programme. Approach them, ask them, the community is there for you! And because any piece of information can be a key to success, we are also keeping a blog where we regularly post former fellows' feedback, or interviews, or accounts from funding bodies, letting you in on some tips and tricks on how to stand out with your application.

See for yourself by following the link to the blog on the bottom left. It goes without saying that you can also find us on Facebook and Twitter where all new calls are posted, too. We are always trying to make it as easy as we can for you. The Independent Social Research Foundation ISRF is a public benefit foundation funded by a group of private philanthropists with interests in academia and social science, founded in It is dedicated to cross-fertilisation in the social sciences, the promotion of new modes of inquiry and the development of interdisciplinary expertise and methods.

One of its specific objectives is to promote better understanding of social entities and processes and see this used in solving subject specific problems. To achieve this objective it intends to provide a series of research grants, enter into partnerships with academic institutions and support research activities that promote development in its field.

There is an increasing recognition — both within and outside academic organisations — that the most pressing social and research challenges are beyond the scope of a single discipline or area of research.Without forcing anyone to confront it directly, we let this question guide our thinking around the Annual Workshop, held in Oxford, as well as a number of smaller workshops and study days.

Alongside many generative discussions this gave rise to two issues of the Bulletin: Mind and Violence, published in June of this year, and the one before you now. Entitled Society and Violence, the present issue seeks to continue the line of questioning set out in the former. One of the key questions posed in Mind and Violence was how violence impacts upon the human psyche. Which immaterial traces do violent encounters leave? How do individuals and collectives negotiate the complex afterlives of destruction or humiliation?

And, conversely, in what ways does the human mind contort itself when seeking to justify, legitimise or otherwise rationalise violence? As the title suggests, the present issue explores violence as a social— or indeed societal—phenomenon. Here, the key issue is not so much where in society violence resides. That way of framing the question casts violence as an unambiguous social relation, an empirical datum that can be located amidst all of the other relations that constitute the social.

The essays that make up this issue dig a little deeper, viewing acts of violence not as given but as disputed. Their wager is that the question ing of violence is immanent to the social domain itself, as the enactment of violence is inevitably accompanied by its problematisation or its justification, its identification or its denial, its critique or its embrace—in other words, its contestation.

Liberally misquoting W. Gallie we might then say that violence is an essentially contested reality. The allusion is of course to W. He argues that our tendency to assume that crime is a physically violent act not only makes us overlook crimes that cannot straightforwardly be understood as physically violent but also leads us to assume that certain modes of behaviour or even forms of identity are in and of themselves violent and therewith criminal.

This gives rise to a normatively charged and racialised conception of criminality that demands to be critically deconstructed. Beth Epstein reflects in her essay on the social fabric of the communities populating the much-discussed and indeed muchmisrepresented banlieues of France. Two worlds collide here, and violence may or may not attend the tensions and antagonisms that result. As Epstein holds out, much hinges on our capacity to listen carefully to the voices that come out of those communities.

Taking elephant camps in colonial Myanmar as his case study, Saha traces how colonial practices were reliant upon the multiplication and reproduction of violence. Here, the collision of worlds is not merely premised upon past violent conquest; it also requires the maintenance of an economy of violence in the present, and likewise projects the unceasing accumulation of violence into the future.

Alongside these three pieces, which all present research funded by the ISRF, this issue also features two contributions that adopt a more reflective position. Elizabeth Frazer, finally, was invited to reflect not on the workshop proceedings but on the contents of the issue before you now.

She departs from the observation that the concept of violence is riddled with ambiguities, partly because violent relations are messy and confusing, partly because their analysis and interpretation is, inevitably, emotionally and normatively laden. The challenge for critical thinking on violence, then, is to remain aware of these ambiguities, to make sure that they inform rather than obstruct our deconstruction of the social world.

Indeed, insofar as real-world problems are by their very nature complex and acute, they are also, by extension, morally and analytically ambiguous. One of the key tasks of the ISRF is therefore to generate an environment in which the challenges that accompany this ambiguity may be faced collectively and constructively. As the Foundation is entering a period of no insignificant change, with its current and first Director of Research retiring inthis mission will undoubtedly remain its foremost concern.

Not all violence pertains to the polis even if ultimately it impacts there. But, while violence might be grounded in human nature the conundrum of violence is a social one; from the human point of view it is both enigmatic and normatively challenging.

This demands a fortitude which is equally emotional and intellectual; the research requires a determined, subtle and intelligent critique that will discern and articulate the hidden, indirect and camouflaged activity that is part of the enigmaticity of violence. Violence is also enigmatic because it is ambiguously related to speech.

On the one hand violence can suppress speech, overtly or covertly, directly or indirectly. On the other hand, it stands in for speech; not only as humour or satire but when as a mode of communication of last resort it takes over when speech runs out. Such thoughts, arising from the workshop and from subsequent feedback—for which my best thanks—lead inexorably to the question of synthesis of approach. How can interdisciplinarity in social science, however understood and pursued, be adequate to Very Large Problems?

At such moments my thoughts stray to the well-worn story of the six blind men all convinced that their take on the elephant of their perceptual encounter is the authoritative one.